YouTube Music Videos Will Now Receive Age Ratings In The UK

YouTube Music Videos Will Now Receive Age Ratings In The UK

After a lengthy trial basis that started in October 2014, music videos posted on YouTube and Vevo will now receive age ratings according to film standards issued by the British Board of Film Classification and the British Phonographic Industry.
(Photo : British Board of Film Classification)

Apparently, YouTube in the UK is tightening up its parental controls: music videos posted on both YouTube and fellow video hosting service Vevo will now include age ratings.Â

The age ratings system was created in conjunction with the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) and the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) and mirrors the way in which movies are assessed for age appropriateness. The UK film equivalents to our PG13s and Rs (12-12As for 12 years and up, 15s for 15 years and up and 18 for 18 years and up, i.e., adults only) will be displayed alongside posted online video content.

The decision came to pass after a lengthy test run implemented in October 2014. During the trial, both sites submitted a total of 132 videos for age rating evaluations. Out of the amassed sample, 56 were given a 12 rating, 56 were slapped with a 15 rating and only one video was branded with an 18 rating — a music video for the song "Couple of Stacks" by hip-hop artist Dizzee Rascals, which features graphic depictions of murder, as well as a beheaded body tottering about.

According to The Guardian, minister for Internet safety and security Lady Joanna Shields found the measures taken by all organizations and companies to be a more-than-hoped-for sign of relief.

"Keeping children safe as they experience and enjoy all the benefits the Internet has to offer is a key priority for this government's one-nation approach to help families across Britain," she said in an interview. "We will continue to work with industry to develop ways to help parents to better protect children online from inappropriate music videos with explicit adult or violent content."Â

Via: The Guardian